Treasure Coast Eye Surgeon Treats the Causes and Symptoms of Chronic Dry Eye Conditions

Treasure Coast Eye Surgeon Treats the Causes and Symptoms of Chronic Dry Eye Conditions

Center for Eye Care & Surgery founder and director Silviano Matamoros, MD, believes that everyone should have access to appropriate eye care. It’s a belief that he regularly puts into action with international mission trips. One condition the doctor regularly provides treatment for both locally and abroad is chronic dry eye syndrome. “Dry eye syndrome is caused basically by a change in the tear film,” informs Dr. Matamoros. “It’s a matter of either having insufficient or poor-quality tears. The tear film is that thin layer of liquid that constantly washes over the eyes to keep them moist and protected. Basically, the tear film is made of three layers. When one of these layers becomes depleted, that’s when dry spots occur on the cornea. “Chronic dry eye syndrome is a medical condition that needs continuous therapy,” confirms Dr. Matamoros. “It can be caused by multiple factors including, but not limited to, advanced age, side effects from medications (antihistamines, nasal decongestants, and blood pressure and acne medications), hormonal changes (pregnancy or menopause), eye diseases (rosacea, blepharitis, meibomian gland dysfunction), and medical conditions (rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus, and other autoimmune disorders).” Who is affected? Dry eye can affect anyone at any age; however, it is much more common as people age. It has been estimated that more than 5.5 million people in the US suffer from some type of symptom associated with dry eyes. Of these, more than 3 million are women and more than 2 million are men. It is also estimated that there are tens of millions more who suffer from this condition and still have not been diagnosed. “For...
Local Eye Surgeon Takes His Advanced Refractive Cataract Surgery Skills Internationally

Local Eye Surgeon Takes His Advanced Refractive Cataract Surgery Skills Internationally

Center for Eye Care & Surgery founder and director Silviano Matamoros, MD, believes that everyone should have access to stateof-the-art eye care. It’s a belief that he regularly puts into action with international mission trips. “Our philosophy is that medicine is a healing art and our advanced technology should be extended to everyone who needs it,” says Dr. Matamoros. “We work very closely with medical institutions in newly developing countries. We’ve developed a strong affiliation with the Hospital Central Managua to establish their new Ophthalmic Institute. We assisted them in their decision-making process to acquire ophthalmology equipment and assisted them in training their staff.” During a recent trip to Managua, Dr. Matamoros and two surgical nurses from our surgical center, Kathleen Buchholz and Joanne Thomas, volunteered their time to perform 30 cataract surgeries. Assessment of pre-cataract surgery using advanced diagnostic OPD-Scan 3 technology. “This was a truly amazing experience,” says the doctor. “A local ophthalmologist prescreened close to two hundred patients to identify those who were in great need of eye surgery. Many of these patients traveled from cities many miles from Managua. We worked cooperatively with the local team, who embraced the project from the beginning to make it successful. “I had the opportunity to provide qualifying patients with the new premium lens called Tetraflex,” says Dr. Matamoros. “This advanced intraocular lens [IOL], currently awaiting approval in the USA, is successfully being used in Europe. “This new, advanced-technology lens gives patients functional near vision while at the same time providing high-quality intermediate and distance vision. Seeing the positive results in my Nicaragua patients with this advanced, premium Tetraflex...
Advance Technology at The Center for Eye Care & Surgery

Advance Technology at The Center for Eye Care & Surgery

Combining the latest state-of-the-art technology with advanced treatment options can aid in the treatment of multiple eye pathologies. Our ophthalmology clinic uses the latest state of the art technology with advance treatment options to aid in the treatment of multiple eye pathologies. Dry eye syndrome is a common condition that we see in our practice,” says Silviano Matamoros, MD, a board-certified ophthalmologist. It has been estimated that more than 5.5 million people in the US suffer from some type of symptom associated with dry eyes. Of these, more than 3 million are women and more than 2 million are men. It is also estimated that there are tens of millions more who suffer from this condition and still have not been diagnosed. “For most people with occasional symptoms, treatment involves over-thecounter eye drops,” says Dr. Matamoros. “However, it is important to determine what is causing the dry eyes and treat the underlying condition.” Dry eye symptoms may be secondary to aqueous tear deficiency, in which the lacrimal glands fail to produce enough watery component to maintain a healthy eye surface. The condition could also be due to meibomian gland dysfunction, causing excessive evaporation of the natural tears. “In the past, the disease was defined as a disorder of the tear film caused by tear deficiency or excessive evaporation. Patients were given samples of over-thecounter artificial tears, and were advised to try them. Of course, this approach, we’ve learned, does not always work.” Accredited care Dr. Matamoros and the staff at the Center for Eye Care & Surgery have in place a comprehensive approach to dry eye syndrome. As an...
NECP Ophthalmologists assist senior citizens

NECP Ophthalmologists assist senior citizens

“I was very pleased with all the services I received from beginning to end,” said Mrs. Johnson, who had read about the NECO in an article in Woman’s World. “Everyone was fantastic.” She plans to have the cataract removed from her right eye, also, in which she has 20/200 vision. Mrs. Johnson is one of more than 178,000 seniors who have been referred for care through the NECP, which offers medical and surgical eye care to U.S. citizens or legal residents, age 65 or older, who do not have access to an ophthalmologist they have seen in the past. An NECP volunteer since opening his private practice two years ago, Dr. Michels says the program exemplifies what medicine is all about. “Sometimes we lose sight of what’s important in what we do, which is to use our skills to help those who really need care. But often those who need us most don’t have access to care in our current system. The NECP is light years ahead of any Clinton plan to provide that sort of service.” When Dr. Michels, a retinal specialist, discover Mrs. Johnson had cataracts, he recommended surgery and referred her to cataract surgeon Silviano Matamoros, MD who perfomed a succesfull cataract operation. Although Dr. Matamoros was not an NECP volunteer at the time, he agreed to perform the surgery. Inspired by his colleague’s commitment to the program, Dr. Matamoros has signed on as a volunteer, joining more than 7,500 NECP ophthalmologists. “It’s gratifying to see how Mrs. Johnson’s quality of life improved,” he said. NECP physicians agree to provide a comprehensive eye exam for patients...
Eye Surgeon applies clear vision to his mission

Eye Surgeon applies clear vision to his mission

“In America, people seek medical attention in the very early stages, as soon as they notice something is wrong. But over there (in Nicaragua), they get to a point where they actually go blind.”Dr. Silviano Matamoros. Port St. Lucie surgeon. Dr. Silviano Matamoros, a Prot St. Lucie eye surgeon, has restored or corrected the vision of 155 Nicaraguans during five missions there in the past year. PORT ST. LUCIE – On missions to Nicaragua, eye surgeon Silviano Matamoros takes modern medicine to an undeveloped country. But more important than what he takes with him is what he leaves behind. During the past year, 155 people have had their vision restored or corrected under his hands. “It’s a good feeling,” Matamoros said. “It’s a very good feeling to know you’ve helped someone.” Matamoros’ office, the Centre for Eye Care and Surgery in Port St. lucie, has sponsored the surgeon’s five trips to Nicaragua during the past year. He returned last week from a recent 6-day mission. During that time, he operated on 22 patients while Nicaraguan doctors observed and assisted. “The idea is to share technology and information with the doctors in that country,” Matamoros said. Nicaraguan doctors help coordinate the visits by screening prospective patients, assisting Matamoros during the surgery and treating patients after their operations. The operation most often performed is one to correct partial or total blindness caused by cataracts. Cataracts can be corrected by surgery. But the disease, which becomes more common as people age, can cause blindness. In cases where cataracts affect both eyes, Matamoros said a person’s life can be improved when just one...
Program offers free eye care.

Program offers free eye care.

Port St. Lucie – elderly people without health insurance do not have to go without their eyesight as well, thanks to doctors like Silviano Matamoros. Under the National Eye Care Project, Matamoros and other area doctors treat patients who either do not have insurance, or whose policies do not cover the procedures they need. Patients who qualify for the National eye Care project pay nothing out of their own pockets. Dr. Silviano Matamoros in an examination room of his Port St. Lucie office. Under the National Eye Care Project, Matamoros and other area doctors treat patients who either do not have insurance, or whose policies do not cover the procedures they need. Patients who qualify for the National Eye Care Project pay nothing out of their own pockets. “Most people have some form of insurance, but some people don’t have eye care coverage,” said Dr. Mark Michels, a West Palm Beach ophthalmologist who participates in the National Eye Care Project. “It’s a good service for the community,” said Michels, who also has an office in Port. St. Lucie. “We’re just triying to provide them with a service they would not otherwise receive”. The National Eye Care Project is sponsored by the Foundation of the American Academy of Ophthalmology. To qualify for the program, a person must be a U.S. citizen or legal resident and 65 years of age or older. They must be unable, for financial reasons, to get medical care from an ophthalmologists who has treated them in the past. Every patient receives a comprehensive medical eye examination and treatment for whatever condition or disease is diagnosed. Participating...